Saturday, March 15, 2008

Simply Wild About White Flowers

S loves white flowers. When we first moved here, we set aside a space to be the white garden. As the seasons changed and the trees grew, it did not turn into the loveliness envisioned, mostly for lack of enough sunlight. But today, there is still evidence of my passion for white flowers. The pure white with just green, is fitting for the honoring of the Irish, so here is a sampling.

Azalea:

100_1927

Camellia:

100_1935

Spirea:

100_1958

Erlicheer (Narcissus):

100_1939

Pansy:

100_1943

Petunias, ready for planting:

100_1942

Wild Violets: the grass contains hundreds of blooms.

100_1928

Violet with grasshopper:

100_1933

Wild Cherokee Rose, just getting started:

100_1946

Tea Olive--a favorite for its heavenly scent:

100_1936

B's English Peas:

100_1941

Wild Plum:

100_1952

Dewberry Blossom:

100_1955

Happy St. Patrick's Day!

4 comments:

lesle said...

Cherokee Park, the westernmost park in the chain of parks in uptown Tallahassee, is named for the Cherokee Roses once planted there by the city.

The roses were there at least into the mid-80s, maybe a tad longer, in the circle made by the sidewalk splitting and curving around it, right in the center of the park.

(There were once two tennis courts on the lower level of the park.)

S N B said...

Thanks, Lesle, for the interesting history. You taught us something. Neither of us remember the courts and we have been here several decades.

lesle said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
lesle said...

Friday, April 4, 5:30 p.m., just spotted a larege clump of blossoming white cherokee roses completely surrounding a pine tree, just next to the very back road in Roselawn Cemetery.